Woman, equal pay and Dagenham


My family profession is Farming! We grew (still do) rice, cashew, coconut, banana, etc., in a village and had cattle too. That’s right! Some of my friends were astonished when I told them I milked cows and chased wild bores out of rice farms. Back in those days we had daily labours for doing various jobs in farm. There were million different jobs in farm as compared to my current profession (developer, tester and manager). Out of them only few men specific jobs, rest were common. Anyway, in any of those jobs women were paid 25% less than men, even if they did same job. When I asked my grandfather about this discrimination, he told “otherwise men will refuse to work! They need this discrimination to work”. Also, he told it is only in some phirangi countries you can expect equality. Now I am in a phirangi country and he was right, there is equality.

Right, now in the context: I went to this British movie “Made in Dagenham”, while whole town queued up for some Zac Efron flick. There was hardly anyone in this screen while I could hear Enthiran beats across the walls.  Anyways, this movie was about a small number of women machinists of Ford factory in Dagenham, making history!. This is where the ignition for “equal pay movement” happened, which swept across industrial world and government realised women deserved same pay as men for same job. Movie review: It’s awesome; I hope it will get some more recognition and awards.

image via filmofila

I was aware that a revolution like this happened in Europe, but I was totally unaware that it happened as early as 70s. That gave me a shock. Just 40 years back in United Kingdom, women were paid less than men, just for one reason – they were women! I was under impression that equality existed since centuries!

I am gonna phone my friends in village sometime and find out if things have changed.

Update

Infographics on “History of women in workspace

Sitayana – Sita’s Epic


The story Ramayana* is his entire life journey starting from his innocent youth, his mastery over skills in winning Sita, his role as dutiful and obedient son to adhere to his father’s words while aware of the flagitious intensions of his step mother. He gives up all the worldly richness and sets away to spend 14 years in jungle. Sita being his wife accompanies him followed by Laxman, Ram’s younger brother.

They spend quite an adventurous and romantic** life in the forest. Sita finds her world in her husband Ram and experiences an unspelled love for him. Everything works fine when one day, Sita gets abducted by Ravana while Ram is away to fulfill one of her impossible wishes. Ram does everything possible to get back his love. He gathers a huge army, builds a bridge across an ocean, does all that he could. Finally, he succeeds to kill Ravana and gets her back. With this they complete 14 years of stay in jungle and they return to their kingdom after which they should have lived happily ever after.

But the story takes turmoil instead, Ram’s story ends here and Sita’s story begins. This happens when a subject of Ram’s kingdom whispers “how could Ram trust Sita, who been with Ravana for so long”. Ram wants a test now, Agni-Pareeksha – A test to check purity of a woman, by entering into fire. Exactly this part of the story becomes hard to digest. This is where so many questions arise and is left unanswered.

  • Did it serve right for a person like Ram ‘the so called God’ to come down to such a cruel act?
  • Is he setting example for all men or rather his followers to commit such an act?
  • Or is he doing right by following well set example from his predecessors?
  • Ram must have done justice to his kingdom? But why not to his wife? Had he really loved her he wouldn’t have banished her at such a crucial moment. Continue reading “Sitayana – Sita’s Epic”

Blank noise project


Blank noise project is one interesting thing happening around metros in India. It started in Bangalore (as I know) against all leaching, touching, pinching, stalking and “ನೊಡ್ಲಾ ಮಗಾ…@^#%@$! ” (FAQ). I did not see anyway to help these heroes, thought I ll give them some more publicity.

Basically it’s a message to women who have experienced this one or the other way.

Continue reading “Blank noise project”

Dignity, sure…!! It’s for women.


Women always had been easy preys for all the experiments of men. Men decide what “their women” wear; they talk, walk and even breathe. Its common mentality that “Dignified” women don’t sit cross legged; they don’t talk loud in a group, don’t attend social functions, travel as much alone as “their” men. What is Unfortunate is even lot of women think “why do we need freedom?

There are several rules to live as women. They are called grandmother rules. Some of them are …

  • Do not go walk around in any crowded public place…
  • Don’t ever make eye-contact with a strange man, …..
  • Any woman who sits in a restaurant alone or …..Etc etc.

One of the major reason people give for molestation is “cloths”. The dress she wears, the way she behaves in public, is inviting trouble. These are very strong point justifying perverts “rights”. I read a bold post on this topic, by wannabe punk. It says

Mentally you are traumatised. Paranoia takes over. You don’t even want to wear the same clothes that you were wearing “that” day. The day you finally come to terms with it, is the day you get harassed again. All the pseudo bravado is shattered

It is as baseless as saying that you got robbed because you were carrying a lot of money. Poor robber what was he supposed to do? He couldn’t control himself, because you were carrying a lot of money so it’s your fault, not the robber’s. It is as absurd as that. So wear what you want

But one thing is for sure. In India a normal woman never give a damn about it “it’s been happening since ages, lets tolerate one more generation”.